Moral Compass

compass_sm“Do not be too moral. You may cheat yourself out of much life so. Aim above morality. Be not simply good; be good for something.”
~Henry David Thoreau

“Morality is of the highest importance – but for us, not for God.”
~Albert Einstein

“Morality is the basis of things and truth is the substance of all morality.”
~Mahatma Gandhi

I’ve been thinking about what makes others consider another person to be a good person, as well as how someone defines themselves. No one is perfect: mistakes are made, ill thoughts can come, hurtful things can be done or said, not always consciously or meant that way,  or selfish reasons can sway you one way or the other…there are so many things that mar the make up of a “good person.” Does that negate the good that they do/are in the long run? Does their being human take away from doing their best to live a good, moral life?

In one of my first meetings with the Rabbi, in my seeking out a side of me that had rarely, if ever, been truly explored, the question of living a good moral life was brought up. It was what I felt religion, in any form, should be about: not so much how you honor God, but how you honor yourself and those around you, seeking out the good in others and yourself, and living it day to day. Mistakes and all. I was unsure of who God was and what role God played in our lives, if at all. I had been surrounded by so many who have this unwavering faith in God…something was missing from my life, and so I am exploring this. Readers who have been with me and this blog all along know that.

To me, doing your best not to harm another person in any way is a start. We do things by our actions and our in-actions that can hurt another, or a group. I find that living a humanistic life, thought process, is more how I’ve interpreted what God would want, or how things have been portrayed through religious services that I’ve attended.

This has been part of my makeup for a long time, even when I’ve been at my most negative. It’s there, lying underneath at times, submerged by a stressed moment, or feelings of fear-especially of the unknown. It’s why I wrote a few days ago about why my bouts of anger bother me.

I get to see the Rabbi today after a full month of no communications. She was away, and now back safe and sound. I am looking forward to continuing our discussions, and seeing where all this will take me.

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About StuHN

I am a creative individual with many areas of passion: Professional Storyteller; NYS Certified Drama Specialist/Educator; Professional Development Coordinator & Facilitator; Workshop Leader; sometime Puppeteer; Playwright; Director; Performer; Teaching Artist; and sometimes more.

Posted on February 6, 2013, in Anger, Caring, counseling, Family, Fear, Friends, Grief, Healing, Inspiration, Love, Mindfulness, Prayers, Spiritual, Support, Therapy, Transformation, Uncategorized and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 8 Comments.

  1. If always trying to do right and can do it most of the time, that’s the best we can do as humans. We all make mistakes. Some big, many small. Hopefully, in the end, the good we’ve done outweighs the bad.

  2. It’s so strange sometimes when I read your words Stuart, because so often they seem to have come out of my head. I had a really bad time last week when I realized that I have fallen shy of being a good person. I mean, while the micro-manager is driving me insane, I didn’t react from a good moral place. I know, I’m human. I make mistakes, but I was really upset with myself about my behavior. This week, I’m trying to be better. That’s all I can do.

  3. It’s a journey worth taking. Bon voyage.

  4. If you are looking for a serious Moral Compass, have a look at The Moral Compass Foundation.

    http://www.themoralcompass.co.uk

    The Moral Compass

    Never instigate the use of coercive force.
    Accept responsibility for personal actions and the consequences of those actions.
    Practice a duty of care.
    Affirm the individual’s right to self-determination.
    Put the truth first.
    Never use a person as merely an unconsenting means to an end, even if the end benefits others.
    Be honest.
    Honour agreements.
    Treat others as you want to be treated yourself.
    Leave a positive legacy to future generations.
    © MCF

  5. For a clear moral compass try The Moral Compass Foundation at http://www.themoralcompass.co.uk

    The Moral Compass

    Never instigate the use of coercive force.
    Accept responsibility for personal actions and the consequences of those actions.
    Practice a duty of care.
    Affirm the individual’s right to self-determination.
    Put the truth first.
    Never use a person as merely an unconsenting means to an end, even if the end benefits others.
    Be honest.
    Honour agreements.
    Treat others as you want to be treated yourself.
    Leave a positive legacy to future generations.
    © MCF

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